Carol Bove is known for her simple yet intricate works that combine found and made elements. Incorporating a wide range of materials, including steel I-beams, driftwood, and peacock feathers, her sculptures, paintings, and prints yield unexpected, poetic, and multilayered meanings that resist categorization. As the art historian Johanna Burton notes, “Bove brings things together not to nudge associative impulses into free play driven by the unconscious, but rather to conjure a kind of affective tangle that disrupts any singular, historical narrative.”1

Born in 1971 in Geneva to American parents, Bove was raised in Berkeley, California and studied at New York University. The artist joined David Zwirner in 2011. In 2015, The Plastic Unit marked her first solo exhibition at the gallery’s London location. On view November 5 through December 17, 2016 at 525 and 533 West 19th Street in New York, David Zwirner will present Polka Dots, a solo show of the artist’s new work.

Bove’s large-scale sculptures are often exhibited outdoors and in public spaces. Most recently, the artist’s steel-beam sculpture, Lingam, was installed in City Hall Park in New York as part of the 2016 summer group exhibition, The Language of Things, organized by Public Art Fund. In 2013, she created a series of sculptures specially for the High Line at the Rail Yards in New York. The project, entitled Caterpillar, was commissioned by High Line Art and ran through 2014. In 2017, the artist’s work will be presented in the Swiss Pavilion for the 57th Venice Biennale.

Bove’s work has been the subject of solo exhibitions at prominent institutions that include The Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Common Guild, Glasgow (both 2013); Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2010); Horticultural Society of New York (2009); Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin (2006); Kunsthalle Zürich; Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (both 2004); and Kunstverein Hamburg (2003). Major group exhibitions include Documenta 13, Kassel, Germany (2012); 54th Venice Biennale (2011); and the Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2008).

In 2014, Bove debuted a new body of work alongside exhibition designs and sculptures by Italian architect Carlo Scarpa. Carol Bove/Carlo Scarpa was curated by the Henry Moore Institute in Leeds, England and produced in collaboration with Museion, Bolzano, Italy and Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens, Deurle, Belgium. The show was first hosted by Museion (November 2014 – March 2015), followed by the Henry Moore Institute (April – July 2015) and Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens (October 2015 – January 2016).

Work by the artist is represented in permanent collections worldwide, including the Fonds Régional d’Art Contemporain (FRAC) Nord-Pas de Calais, Dunkerque, France; Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Princeton University Art Museum, New Jersey; Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, Connecticut; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; and the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut. She lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

1Johanna Burton, “Rebounding,” in Carol Bove: Polka Dots. Exh. cat. (New York: David Zwirner Books, 2016), p. 62.